August 2012

The August edition of the American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene features a new study offering strong evidence of people surviving rabies bites without treatment in remote Amazonian communities.

These materials are embargoed for release until 5:00 pm Eastern Time// 2100 Hours GMT on Wednesday, August 1, 2012.


New Studies on Natural Rabies Resistance

  • PHOTOS AND ILLUSTRATIONS:
Amy Gilbert, PhD

Lead Author of the Study, Amy Gilbert, PhD (JPG, 2.1 MB)

Vampire bats in an abandoned mine in Huanuco, Peru (IMAGE CREDIT: Daniel Streicker) (JPG, 208 KB)

Vampire bats in an abandoned mine in Huanuco, Peru (IMAGE CREDIT: Daniel Streicker) (JPG, 343 KB)


Common vampire bat Peru (IMAGE CREDIT: Daniel Streicker) (JPG, 3.69 MB)

Common vampire bat Peru (IMAGE CREDIT: Daniel Streicker) (JPG, 2.71 MB)

Common vampire bat Peru (IMAGE CREDIT: Daniel Streicker) (JPG, 2.44 MB)


Santa Marta, Peru (IMAGE CREDIT: Sergio Recuenco) (JPG, 907 KB)

Santa Marta, Peru (IMAGE CREDIT: Amy T. Gilbert) (JPG, 177 KB)                            Download the High-Resolution Version Here

Truenococha, Peru (IMAGE CREDIT: Sergio Recuenco) (JPG, 867 KB)


Truenococha, Peru (IMAGE CREDIT: Brett W. Petersen) (JPG, 2.6 MB)

Truenococha, Peru (IMAGE CREDIT: Brett W. Petersen) (JPG, 3.27 MB)

Truenococha, Peru (IMAGE CREDIT: Sergio Recuenco) (JPG, 867 KB)


Truenococha, Peru (IMAGE CREDIT: Amy T. Gilbert) (JPG, 135 KB)                          Download the High-Resolution Version Here

CDC Team with Ministry of Health collaborator in Truenococha, Peru (IMAGE CREDIT: Sergio Recuenco) (JPG, 941 KB)

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